The Plan Comes Together

So, after the two-week (for me) Tet Holiday, life is returning to normal. I was in the “country”. It wasn’t that conducive to writing blogs.

But I ate so well and the people are so incredible nice, former VC or not! It was both overwhelming and amazing, but this is a story for another time.

I think I finally have a plan to get Dauntless up the west coast, that I am comfortable with. Sometimes it seems like the plan comes together immediately, sometimes it takes a lot of time. The reality is that every plan takes a long time to gestate. Plans seem to come together immediately only when I’ve been thinking about them forever before putting pen to paper. However, in this case, I feel like I’ve been writing continuous plans since September, just to move Dauntless the 2200 miles to southern California.

25-Feb-18   2018 Option C  
07-May-18 Huatulco 0.0  Alloc 0 0  Running nm legs Hours in transit
12-May-18 P Roquita Island/Acapulco 1.8       5 49 5 245      245
15-May-18 P Zihuatenjo 0.8       3 37 3 110      110         355     355 61
18-May-18 P Caleta de Campos 0.6       3 27 3 80        80
20-May-18 P Cabeza Negra N 0.5       2 33 2 65        65
27-May-18 P Manzanillo 0.4       7 9 7 60        60         560     205 35
02-Jun-18 P PV 1.6       6 38 6 230      230
08-Jun-18 P Mazatlan or Cabo San Lucas 1.4       6 33 6 200      200         990     430 74
20-Jun-18 P Cabo San Lucas 312 1.6     12 18 12 220      220      1,210     220 38
02-Sep-18 P Cabo San Lucas 312 0     74 0 74 0        –
12-Sep-18 P Turtle Bay 320 3     10 42 10 420      420      1,630     420 72
20-Sep-18 P Baja Calif Ensenada 340 2       8 38 8 300      300      1,930     300 51
26-Sep-18 P S.B. Channel Islands (SD +50) 310 2       6 47 6 280      280      2,210     280 48
13-Oct-18 P SF Bay 333 2     17 18 17 300      300      2,510     300 51

This assumes that the winds and seas are favorable only 25% of the time. E.g. it requires 74 hours (3 days) from  Manzanillo to Mazatlan, so I allocate at least 12 days to get there. Now, we understand that those 25% of times of favorable winds could take place in almost any combination. One day in four is the least likely, due to the nature of the synoptic weather pattern needed to disrupt the usual northwesterly winds. It’s more likely to be in chunks of 4 days out of 3 weeks or 6 days out of 5 weeks.

This means that I must have something I am not known for, patience. Even the word makes me cringe.

And even if I have a planned stop in XXX, as long as the winds stay nice, I need to keep moving north.

The intermediate places like Acapulco, etc. are possible stops if the weather turns unfavorable or whatever.

First goal is to get Dauntless to Baja California, preferably Cabo San Lucas or perhaps Ensenada, by mid-June. The fallback plan is to get at least to Mazatlán.  I have a wedding in Salt Lake City June 23rd that I’d really want to attend, however getting Dauntless north safely has to be my primary goal.

Once there, I’ll leave Dauntless for the two months in summer.

I need to re-arrange my affairs a bit and see some friends, so I’ll travel to Alaska, Seattle, San Francisco and Texas.

I also need to scout some possible locations in California for Dauntless for the winter 2018-2019. Cost and security are the primary considerations. If you have any ideas or suggestions, please email me directly. I’d appreciate the input.

I’ll then return to Vietnam for two months. I’ve accepted the fact that Trinh will not have a visa for anyplace this coming summer, so I’ll be working on 2019.

Retuning in September, I’ll spend 6 weeks getting her (Dauntless, not Trinh) to her winter haven in California.

This plan offers me safety in that I like traveling a bit off shore (as opposed to near coastal) and making the 2500 nm trip into chunks of miles and time that are doable, even if I have to do some parts alone.

I’d prefer to have some crew/help, 2 people, a couple, would be ideal, 1 or 3 would be good.

Author: Richard on Dauntless

I’m an eclectic person, who grew up in New York, lived overseas for many years and have a boat, Dauntless, a 42 foot Kadey Krogen trawler yacht. Dauntless enables me to not only live in many different parts of the world, but to do it in a way that is interesting, affordable, with the added spice of a challenge. Dauntless also allows me to be in touch with nature. As the boat glides through the ocean, you have a sense of being part of a living organism. When dolphins come to frolic, they stay longer if you are out there talking to them, watching them. Birds come by, sometimes looking for a handout; sometimes grateful to find a respite from their long journey. I grew up on the New York waterfront, in the West Village, when everything west of Hudson St. was related to shipping and cargo from around the world. For a kid, it was an exciting place of warehouses, trucks, and working boats of all kinds: tugs and the barges and ships, cargo and passenger, they were pushing around. My father was an electrical engineer, my mother an intellectual, I fell in between. I have always been attracted to Earth’s natural processes, the physical sciences. I was in 8th grade when I decided to be a Meteorologist. After my career in meteorology, my natural interest in earth sciences: geology, astronomy, geography, earth history, made it a natural for me to become a science teacher in New York City, when I moved back to the Big Apple. Teaching led to becoming a high school principal to have the power to truly help kids learn and to be successful not only in school but in life. Dauntless is in western Europe now. In May and June, I will be wrapping up the last two years in northern Europe, heading south to spend the rest of the year in Spain & Portugal. Long term, I’m planning on returning to North American in the fall of 2017 and from there continuing to head west until we’re in Northeast Asia, Japan and South Korea, where we will settle for a bit. But now, my future lies not in NY or even Europe, but back to the water, where at night, when the winds die down, there is no noise, only the silence of the universe. I feel like I am at home, finally.

One thought on “The Plan Comes Together”

  1. Richard, re: California moorage options. I recently visited the Vallejo Yacht Club and found it to be an affordable moorage option in otherwise expensive Bay Area. Founded in 1900, the club is low-key, mostly working class members and costs next to nothing to join. Nice facilities behind locked gates with excellent moorage just off the San Pablo Bay. Btw, Jack London was a charter member of the VYC! Here’s a link to their website: http://www.vallejoyc.org

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