Days 1 & 2 The Canaries to Barbados

After topping up the portside fuel tank, we had a quick lunch, as I was hot to trot.

La Restinga
THe Wonderful Town of La Restinga

As we pulled away from the dock of this peaceful little town, I already knew I would miss it once in the Caribbean. As we came around the protective wall of the harbor, I gave one long blast on the horn, to warn any boats entering that we were leaving and as our way of saying goodbye to a place we really liked.

One long horn blast means “attention” as in pay attention, I’m doing something you may not be able to see.  Last year in the Baltic, I noticed that the Germans always gave a long blast when entering a harbor.  Just like in the Canaries, most of the harbors have a tall jetty to protect them from the waves, but it also hides boats coming in or out. Thus, the warning.

The Island of El Hierro We say goodbye to 2+ years in Europe
The Island of El Hierro
We say goodbye to 2+ years in Europe

As we settled into our course 258°, the winds were from 120° at 15 knots, thus we had winds and waves from our port side quarter panel.  Not the best, but it could be worse.  After just a few minutes, I realized we needed to deploy at least one bird to cut the rolling which had increased to ±15°. That’s a lot.

With one bird in the water, I speed was only reduced by about 0.5 knots, but 2/3s of the roll was gone.

As I watched the sea, I also realized we had a large, 10 foot plus swell coming from the west with a period of about 10 seconds.  Not too bad, but not helpful either.

The 1st on many Sunsets at Sea
The 1st on many Sunsets at Sea

Over the next 24 hours’ conditions remained exactly the same.

wp-1483026744009.jpg
Weather data at the end of the first day. I am also recalibrating water tank fill as we use water maker

I remember writing the above.

The last words I wrote for 20 days.  Umm, I wonder why? Barbados? Stay tuned.

 

 

Published by Richard on Dauntless

I’m an eclectic person, who grew up in New York, lived overseas for many years and have a boat, Dauntless, a 42 foot Kadey Krogen trawler yacht. Dauntless enables me to not only live in many different parts of the world, but to do it in a way that is interesting, affordable, with the added spice of a challenge. Dauntless also allows me to be in touch with nature. As the boat glides through the ocean, you have a sense of being part of a living organism. When dolphins come to frolic, they stay longer if you are out there talking to them, watching them. Birds come by, sometimes looking for a handout; sometimes grateful to find a respite from their long journey. I grew up on the New York waterfront, in the West Village, when everything west of Hudson St. was related to shipping and cargo from around the world. For a kid, it was an exciting place of warehouses, trucks, and working boats of all kinds: tugs and the barges and ships, cargo and passenger, they were pushing around. My father was an electrical engineer, my mother an intellectual, I fell in between. I have always been attracted to Earth’s natural processes, the physical sciences. I was in 8th grade when I decided to be a Meteorologist. After my career in meteorology, my natural interest in earth sciences: geology, astronomy, geography, earth history, made it a natural for me to become a science teacher in New York City, when I moved back to the Big Apple. Teaching led to becoming a high school principal to have the power to truly help kids learn and to be successful not only in school but in life. Dauntless is in western Europe now. In May and June, I will be wrapping up the last two years in northern Europe, heading south to spend the rest of the year in Spain & Portugal. Long term, I’m planning on returning to North American in the fall of 2017 and from there continuing to head west until we’re in Northeast Asia, Japan and South Korea, where we will settle for a bit. But now, my future lies not in NY or even Europe, but back to the water, where at night, when the winds die down, there is no noise, only the silence of the universe. I feel like I am at home, finally.

2 thoughts on “Days 1 & 2 The Canaries to Barbados

  1. I always admire your courage to pursue your adventure and the ever-evolving skills you develop and hone, my friend. Wishing you the best in the New Year and grateful to have had the opportunity to join you for a snippet of yours and Dauntless’ travels. Take care! Tam

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